Organizing My Chaos
Just a place for me to dump out all my derpyness. I have so much random thoughts while looking at things on the internet that I just need to get out.
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1 week ago
327,702 notes - reblog

potatobastard:

koikoimotherfuckers:

that-man-is-playing-galaga:

Some people just know how to do birthday cards.

birthday cards against humanity

3 months ago
328 notes - reblog

ionahi:

ionahi:

click on the brushes for descriptions

i was asked to post these so here are the brushes that i currently use for my works! :D  for my past brushes please see my tutorial post.

I’ve been getting asked again about brushes. here they are again if you’re curious! the lineart brush I’ve been using recently is the pakPen

3 months ago
193 notes - reblog
ionahi:

one of the items i’ll be offering as a print soon at my store. gotta go get some samples this weekend and see what will look the best and then looking into packaging arrangements =v= //flops away
oh yeah this will be offered at 11x17 for sure

ionahi:

one of the items i’ll be offering as a print soon at my store. gotta go get some samples this weekend and see what will look the best and then looking into packaging arrangements =v= //flops away

oh yeah this will be offered at 11x17 for sure

3 months ago
726 notes - reblog
ionahi:

the-king-frost:

[good luck]
[this will be offered as a print at my store soon. 11x17in for sure]

this comes from something i did with my mother when i was little. she used to say that tying flowers to your toes was good luck ;;v;;

ionahi:

the-king-frost:

[good luck]

[this will be offered as a print at my store soon. 11x17in for sure]

this comes from something i did with my mother when i was little. she used to say that tying flowers to your toes was good luck ;;v;;

3 months ago
269 notes - reblog
ionahi:

in response to this post

ionahi:

in response to this post

3 months ago
42 notes - reblog

ionahi:

why sirisderp and i shouldn’t have conversations at 5 in the morning:
generalpitchiner this is all your fault D:

Tsarina/Kozmotis Pitchiner talk below cut

Read More

3 months ago
134 notes - reblog

the-king-frost:

[blackice King and Pitch style (with little Sparrow) background repeater. you are welcome to use this image however you would like. just save the first image to your files.]

3 months ago
396 notes - reblog
ionahi:

here’s another ver of the repeat wallpaper. save the image and you can use it on your desktop or blogs! ;;v;;

ionahi:

here’s another ver of the repeat wallpaper. save the image and you can use it on your desktop or blogs! ;;v;;

3 months ago
2,048 notes - reblog
— Character development versus pacing

keyboardsmashwriters:


I can totally relate to this, wow. Character development is so much fun that we pretty much let ourselves get carried away with it. But that’s cool, and let me tell you why.

Write freely. If you seriously enjoy writing out these characters and their relationship, you should seriously write it. Seriously. You write because you want to write, first and foremost. Write the story you want to tell, and don’t worry about what it’s supposed to read or look like to everyone else. Write the story you enjoy telling, even if that story is full of “filler” scenes.

Allowing yourself to write freely means you’re conquering those limitations that our inner critic likes to assert on us and our creative process. Listening to that inner critic all the time can be harmful, taxing, and make us fear putting even a single word down. This is when the volume of the inner critic has turned itself up to screaming – we can’t help but to listen until our ears bleed.

But having the inner critic in your head isn’t a bad thing, as long as the volume’s turned down to something that allows us to create without fear. It’s good to look at our work critically as long as it doesn’t interfere with us achieving our goal. As soon as that angry little voice stops us, we need to turn the volume down.

So, if you really enjoy writing character development, but you also really enjoy writing a fast-paced story, here are some things to keep in mind while you’re writing:

  • Exploring characters. Sometimes filling out endless character charts or face casting isn’t enough. Often what really gets us into the brains of our characters is actually writing them, and not just writing them outside the story, but within the context of the plot. Characters begin developing from the first page of the story, so those tidbits you might have written outside the story don’t show where your character is at the moment the story begins. Writing out the scenes that may be removed from the final product later is perfectly fine, as it only helped us explore that character further and portray them more accurately in the scenes that are kept.
  • Character arcs. In that same vein, remember that the character arc is just as important as the plot arc. The usual idea of “action”, such as fists flying or car chases, isn’t the only thing that drives pacing. Character arcs can also have rising action, inciting incidents, twists – all that same fun stuff. And also in that same vein –
  • Keep the plot in mind. When the plot develops, so do the characters. And when the characters develop, so does the plot. Think of how these development scenes bleed into each other, how you can tie what’s happening with the characters with what’s happening in the plot. Some of the best development happens when the plot happens to the characters, or the characters happen to the plot.
  • Thinking of pacing. How much of these development scenes are just idle chatter and playing around, and how much shows tension and active evolution? There’s a difference between characters sitting around discussing inconsequential life things, and characters sitting around discussing something that’s related to the plot, making those connections and unpacking details – even revealing how they feel about what’s going on, which is just as important as any action scene. Many things drive pacing aside from simply action, and oftentimes one of those many things can simply be a character with agency.
  • The first draft is the first draft for a reason. The first draft is throwing darts and hoping each one strikes the bull’s-eye. Well, that’s not how things work out. Some darts don’t even stick, especially if we’re working on our first novels and the process is still new. Some darts will bounce off. Some darts will strike measly points. Some darts’ll even strike the wall three feet away, or knock off other darts. It’s all a part of the process.
  • Perfection is the enemy. Writing is both trial and error. Don’t be afraid of the error.


Revise wisely. This means, of course, finding the best approaches to revising (as in, the approaches that work best for you). This also means it’s time to turn that critical voice up a notch, to focus those analytical eyes on what scenes are carrying their weight, versus what scenes aren’t.

When paring down a narrative, you never want to strip it bare. The plot isn’t the only critical element of a story, after all, and if you carve out all of that necessary in-between, what you end up with is just a skeleton with no soul. A plot, not a story.

But that doesn’t mean you should feel intimidated about doing any major renovations or overhauls. When considering how much of the character “filler” is too much, think about these things:

  • Eliminate scenes. Cut and paste them into a separate file so you don’t have to lose them entirely (“deleted scenes” are little fun things that you might use later). It might be that the events that took place in this scene still happened, even if the reader doesn’t get to see it. Sometimes a summary of what happened does the job in fewer words. Or, if there’s an event that takes place, or some sort of critical piece of information that’s revealed, but it still doesn’t need an entire scene, you might consider –
  • Combine scenes. It might be beneficial to have multiple important things happen in one scene, as opposed to multiple scenes where only one thing happens. Be careful about this, however, because you don’t want to strain “convenient coincidence”, as in the characters discover they need to find this elusive thing that no one has ever found before, and—oh, look at that, they find it on the first try in the same scene.
  • Cut passages. This post, under “Transition”, briefly discusses what I mean. If there’s padding between scenes that feels superfluous or extraneous, or delaying the continuation of the story without reasonable cause, such as when characters have inner reflection, cut it or summarize it.
  • Trim dialogue. Sometimes characters get away from us and segue into conversations that they weren’t supposed to get into. Mom talking about dishes? Dishes not critical to the plot arc or character development arc? Cut it or summarize it.


In the end, you’ll get a better idea of what your story looks like after you’ve written it. Then (after you’ve stuffed the story out of sight for a while) you’ll get a much more accurate idea of what the story reads like, or what the story even is, and you can also have your writerly friends read and give you their own opinions.

So, in short, write all that stuff. During the writing process, it’s important. Once you hit the revising process, grab your axe.

Good luck!

3 months ago
217,771 notes - reblog

(Source: meghannnleighhh)

3 months ago
2,001 notes - reblog
"You might be poor, your shoes might be broken, but your mind is a palace."
Hoppy O’Halloran, Angela’s Ashes  (via psych-facts)
3 months ago
1,824 notes - reblog
"If you want to improve, be content to be thought foolish and stupid."
Epictetus  (via psych-facts)
3 months ago
56,038 notes - reblog
3 months ago
13,843 notes - reblog
"Sometimes people just want to be happy, even if it’s not real."
Veronica Roth, Insurgent (via ohteenscanrelate)

(Source: ohteenscanrelate)

3 months ago
1,207 notes - reblog
— Third Person Omniscient

thecharactercomma:

A step away from the more common “limited” viewpoint, omniscience places the narrator in a position of all-knowing and all-seeing power. The narration can easily jump from MC Martha to Love Interest Lucy to George the Cashier, within the same chapter and often without page breaks. As readers, we can effectively see things from the point of best perspective or the point of best action, even if the best perspective is a bird flying overhead or Generic Soldier #1. Not every character will get a complete arc, but each head you get inside should still have a distinctive personality. It’s a hard line to balance, since you’ve got the narrative voice on top of a unique character voice. It’s not difficult to give a unique voice to your main characters, but not every generic onlooker should sound the same, either.

The perspective allows you to follow the action. If Martha gets knocked out, instead of time jumping to when she wakes up, you can shift into Lucy’s head for a bit. You’re not even limited to the main characters—you can easily get into the villain’s head and let us know what they have planned. This can, however, make it hard to give a good plot twist. This will usually shift your story’s focus to not be on the twist itself, but how they deal with the results.

The narrator might foreshadow upcoming events, either of importance or not. It adds a level of dramatic irony (where you know more than the characters). And really, be careful just to hint. The narrator might already know how things end, but you don’t want to give things away if it’s important.

Often the narrator has its own voice. Many times when I see 3rd person omniscient narrators, they use their all-seeing powers to pop into the heads of random characters as an opportunity for comic relief. They might make fun of characters, or offer their own opinions on the events. The characters have no idea that this all-seeing narrator is following their thoughts and actions, so again, dramatic irony.

The perspective allows characters to inspect each other, which makes relationships and possible relationships less suspenseful. Instead of being stuck in Martha’s head the entire time, wondering if Lucy likes her or not, the narrator can very easily switch to Lucy and give an insight about her feelings towards Martha. 3rd person omniscient is very common in romance novels for this reason. It ups the tension knowing they both like each other, but neither will admit it. The tension comes in their personal struggle to act or not act on their desires.

Examples of sentences you might read in third person omniscient:

A woman across the street saw the teenager disappear into the wormhole, but paused only a minute. She blinked. A trick of the eyes, she decided. Besides, she was already late for work.

Grug the goblin scurried away to do his master’s command, pleased that his expertise would finally be recognized. He’d get a promotion for this—all he had to do was kill some overrated girl with a sword. But Grug had a lot to learn about girls with swords.

Genres typically told in this tense:

  • High Fantasy, especially when there is an emphasis on fight scenes. Each fighter can react and size up the other’s movements, and appreciate each other’s skills. (The Legend of Drizzt series by RA Salvatore)
  • Romance. Like stated before, there’s tension in knowing what each side wants, and then knowing why they won’t act on it. Plus, romances generally cater towards a female audience. This POV allows readers into the more familiar woman’s perspective as well as the man’s romantic thoughts towards her. You can read all the romantic things your man never says out loud, but still thinks about!
  • Anything can be told in this POV, but make sure there’s a reason for it. Since the default storytelling mode is 3rd person limited, there should be purpose in straying from that.

If you want to write in this perspective, read plenty of books written in it. Here are a handful of book recommendations in 3rd person omniscient to get your started: Downsiders by Neal Shusterman, Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer, The Legend of Drizzt series by RA Salvatore. The first two link to book reviews with a creative writing analysis, both of which talk more about the narrative voice and ways to successfully implement a 3rd person omniscient narrative.

An overview of the other points of view.

—E

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